PostSecondary Education and Training

Youth with disabilities should think about their strengths and interests, as well as what is available before considering different fields to pursue after high school graduation. Youth who may never have considered higher education or further technical training as an option should be encouraged to think about such opportunities.  Postsecondary education can include many kinds of education and training programs, including two- and four-year colleges, technical schools, short term education programs, on the job training and more.

To begin looking at the possibility of postsecondary education, youth should consider admission requirements or pursuing education/training without earning a degree. Other things to consider are: how to get information about colleges or technical colleges; what to look for when going on a campus visit; how to advocate for accommodations; and how to provide disability documentation to receive disability services.

Resources

Opening Doors to Postsecondary Education and Training:  This booklet from the WI DPI has been created to assist students with disabilities, parents, school counselors, and others on the IEP team in planning for the student's postsecondary experience. It includes information to help students understand their strengths and identify the support and resources they will need to be successful at the postsecondary level.

Students with Disabilities Preparing for Post-secondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities, U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Civil Rights: The information in this pamphlet, provided by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in the U. S. Department of Education, explains the rights and responsibilities of students with disabilities who are preparing to attend postsecondary schools. This pamphlet also explains the obligations of a postsecondary school to provide academic adjustments, including auxiliary aids and services, to ensure the school does not discriminate on the basis of disability.

ACT Services for Students with Disabilities: Information about documenting an applicant's disability and the process for requesting accommodations to take the ACT.

ThinkCollege!  College Options for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Doors to colleges are opening for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities in many different ways all over the country. This website is designed to share what is currently going on, provide resources and strategies, let you know about training events, and give you ways to talk to others. The information is for transition aged students as well as adults attending or planning for college. It provides resources and tools for students, families, and professionals.  

Resources

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  • WiTransition App Paper Version
    The paper application is intended to be used when technology isn't readily available or for youth to complete ahead of time and input information in one sitting. The application does not save, but a pdf can be generated and emailed to individuals the student chooses.
  • Transición versión en papel - WiTransition App Paper Version - Spanish
    The paper application is intended to be used when technology isn't readily available or for youth to complete ahead of time and input information in one sitting. The application does not save, but a pdf can be generated and emailed to individuals the student chooses.
  • You Got This! Educational Pathways for Youth Transitioning from Juvenile Justice Facilities
    If you will be eligible for transition into a community school after you leave a juvenile justice facility, this packet is for you. We’ve put together a few tips and suggestions to help you get back into school. You can read all 12 pages or just the ones you need. The most important thing to know is that you have rights and, while it won’t always be easy, we’re here to help you. And for others reading this guide who work with youth in some capacity, no matter what role you play, we recommend you provide middle and high school age youth with a copy of this guide as soon as they come in contact with the justice system. Effective preparation can serve as a critical step to ensuring a smooth transition from a juvenile justice facility back to school.